Black/ White Filter test

When in the Netherlands earlier this year – I managed to take a few test images using my Black/ White filter set on the Rolleiflex TLR Planar 2.8 camera. I have been using the yellow filter a little more of lately because of its heightening contrast within an image – and have tried the orange and red filters on occasion – but I had never really gotten round to using the green, or blue filter at all!

 

The camera was mounted on a tripod during exposures, during a sunny spell during this January day and the ground was covered in snow. I have taken the first image without a filter by way of comparison – and when scanning with a Canoscan 9000f have set the parameters to this image, not shifting them for the others. No further editing has been done – not even spot removal. There was no lens shade on the camera. Images have been shot on Kodak T-max 100 ISo film and developed in Rodinal (R09).

 

I was fairly surprised to find such a big shift in contrast when using the red filter and actually a reduction from the Orange and Yellow ones. I would have expected to see a gradual build-up, but that might just be subject matter related. The overall tones of the scenes were Blue (sky), brown/ grey (trees, posts), murky green/ brown (water) and white (snow, clouds). I did actually like the effects of the blue and green filter as they make the water a little more clear and define the snow on the tree branches – but I cannot really understand where that flash of overexposure on the left side of the ‘blue filter’  frame comes from! I’ll have to look into that – just a well as I’ll have to find a better way to deal with the dried drops on the film and the ‘rings’ that show up every few frames when scanning.

 

These rings are actually called ‘ Newton rings’ : ’Newton’s rings usually form due to interference created by reflection of light from a flat surface onto a spherical surface. In scanners moisture on either the negative or on the glass surface (the tiny spherical droplets of moisture are responsible for the concentric rings in the pattern) can result in this problem.’ (lomography.com)

 

The answer seems to be to not let the film touch the plate, which is easier said than done, but I’ll give it a go on next scans 🙂

 

 

no filter

no filter

Yellow filter

Yellow filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

no filter

no filter

Orange filter

Orange filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

no filter

no filter

 Red filter

Red filter

 

 

no filter

no filter

Green filter

Green filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

no filter

no filter

Blue filter

Blue filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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