Photography Presentation: Greg Funnell

Almost every single time I’m writing a blog post I’m wandering where time went. In this specific post I wanted to write about a photography presentation by Greg Funnell that I went to on the 12th of February, and that was already well over a week ago! Thanks goodness ‘late is better than never’, and his work has not gone out of fashion in this short time span.

This talk was organised by the Phocus group. From his website www.gregfunnell.com:

 

“Greg studied History and War Studies at Kings College London before moving into photography. He’s since  spent the last 8 years working for clients that include Vanity Fair, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Guardian, the Financial Times, the Washington Post. Shooting everything from commissioned celebrity portraits, to travel assignments, in-depth documentary features and development work in the field for NGOs. He also works in the commercial and advertising sector producing campaigns and content for clients on international campaigns, especially in the travel, lifestyle and adventure industries.

His work for charities and NGO’s in the UK and abroad, involves being relied upon to deliver the goods in often unstable environments. Having worked across Africa, South East Asia and Latin America for clients such as Save the Children, ActionAid and WWF.”

 

As the talk began, I felt a little bit like an intruder as I was the only non (phd) student present. The talk was interesting: Greg told us about his life so far (he’s only in his early 30’s), how he got into photo journalism by starting at the college newspaper, taking silly risks like going abroad without a solid plan and getting caught up in crossfires and learning on the job. He presented us with tips to get into the trade, amusing anecdotes about people he photographed and a short list of recommended books to read. He’s taken a ton of amazing images so far, my favourite ones being the surfing images (I’m prejudiced!) and his portrait work.

I will also admit to finding slight amusement in Greg’s apparent diversion from his original planned story at times – it’s so recognisable. I’ve only presented my wet-plating work twice, but both times I happily went on several side-roads to the subject we were discussing.

Meeting Greg afterwards, I was a little surprised to hear that he has an interest in learning about wet plate photography. We agreed that come spring, he and his assistant could make the journey up from London to experience the process first-hand and perhaps even start using it in their London studio. I do hope he decides to do just that!

 

Featured image by Greg Funnell, you can see more of his work on his website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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